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Jun. 23rd, 2014

Blogging - WIth Computer

[sticky post] LiveJournal Is My Backup Blog

This is my back up blog. It shadows my blogspot which is more frequently updated and better maintained.

Please feel free to friend me here, but be aware that I can not friend you back. I have maxed out my friend allotment from the LJ gods, sorry.

Feb. 5th, 2016

Blogging - WIth Computer

Audible Now Offers Crudrat and A Carriger Quartet


Gentle Reader, I am delighted to announce that, finally, after a great deal of effort (thank you Dan) you can now buy the full cast audio production of Crudrat on Audible for $18. We are also offering an Audio CD through Amazon only (at the moment, we hope to find other distributors) for $25.


Crudrat is a YA sci-fi adventure in the style of Heinlein written with young women in mind. It was backed as a kickstarter for full cast audio. Learn more about Crudrat. Learn more about the kickstarter (now over).

Right now I have no intention of turning Crudrat into a print book. Ask me about it in person some time and I'll explain my reasoning.

But there's more!


You can also buy on Audible, bundled under the name A Carriger Quartet for $6, the full cast productions of my four short stories that were part of the stretch goals for the kickstarter. The Audio CD is $20 on Amazon only.


These stories are: My Sister's Song (the first story I ever had published), The Curious Case (featuring Alessandro Tarabotti), Fairy Debt, and Marine Biology (my only existing contemporary M/M paranormal romance). Learn more about these short stories.

These stories are only available in print books when combined in an anthology. Both Curious Case and Fairy Debt have been recently picked up to appear in now anthologies in the coming year. I'll let you know more when I do.

Questions Answered


The CDs are listed as Temporarily out of Stock. !?
Ignore. It's a print-on-demand thing. They should ship if you order. If not, it's Amazon being janky.

Can we get Crudrat and A Quartet on Audible in Australia, UK, or the rest of the world?
It should be available worldwide, we did trigger that setting when uploading to Audible. If you still can't get it, it is available for sale on Gumroad via the Crudrat website as well.

What about the CDs worldwide?
Probably not.

MP3 CDs?
Still working on that one.

Kickstarter Update
There are a few kickstarter rewards still to come and there should be information on that coming to backers from my producer Dan very soon.


{Gail's monthly read along for February is Terrier: The Legend of Beka Cooper Book 1 by Tamora Pierce.}

GAIL'S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .
Evelyn Tripp on the cover of Charm magazine, May 1954 via theniftyfifties tumblr

Your Infusion of Cute . . .
Incredible Footage Reveals How the Coconut Octopus Got Its Name

Your Tisane of Smart . . .
Portrait of a Lady, A Brief History of the term “Lady”

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .
99 Ways to Spread the Word About A Book You Love


PROJECT ROUND UP


  • Imprudence ~ Custard Protocol Book the Second. Edit pass. Releases July 19, 2016 in print & eBook to US.

  • Poison or Protect ~ A Delightfully Deadly Novella. Reworking & trimming. Release date to come. Gail's first foray into hybrid land, featuring a grown up and several-times widowed Preshea and the gentle Scottish captain who could change everything.




Gail Carriger's Scribbles!



The Custard Protocol Series (1890s ~ ongoing)
1 Prudence, 2 Imprudence (July 19, 2016)
$0.99 short stories (ebook only)
Marine Biology; My Sister's Song; Fairy Debt;
The Curious Case (featuring Alessandro Tarabotti)

Book News:
Tsana’s Reads and Reviews says of Crudrat: “I recommend it to fans of adventure-style SF and coming of age stories.”

Quote of the Day:
'Bring my shaving things.'
A gleam of hope shone in the man's eye, mixed with doubt.
'You mean, sir?'
‘And shave off my moustache.'
There was a moment's silence. I could see the fellow was deeply moved.
'Thank you very much indeed, sir,' he said, in a low voice.
~ Carry On, Jeeves by P.G. Wodehouse


Want Gail in you inbox once a month? Get the Chirrup!
Gail on Facebook & Twitter & Goodreads & Tumblr.
Gail's fashion blog ~ Retro Rack.

Questions about Gail's steampunk world? There's a wiki for that!

Feb. 3rd, 2016

Blogging - WIth Computer

Prudence Deleted Scenes


Just FYI, Gentle Reader, it is Steampunk Hands Around the World month. I'll be posting something eventually in accordance with the theme "A Few of My Favorite Steampunk Things." Hop on over to the Airship Ambassador if you want to read along or participate.

In honor of Prudence now being available in paperback, here are some deleted scenes from that book.

SPOILER ALERT if you haven't yet read it.

Since this series is currently being written, please be aware that deleted scenes may and often do contain spoilers for this series AND both other series (since this is chronologically last). Read at your own risk.

Paris - Sur le pont de la Concorde, 1890 via @valmad76 Twitter


Prudence Deleted Scenes


Percy on Rue's Lightskirt Outfit
Percy said, probably just to contradict, because he never noticed such things, "I think she looked smashing."
"Thank you, Percy."
"And disease free."
"Thank you Percy."
He evaluated her over this spectacles. "With only a touch of the street side doxy."
"Thank you, Percy!"

Dama & Uncle Biffy Conflict over Shopping with Rue & Primrose
Dama took Prim's deviance from her mother's questionable taste as a point of personal pride. When, in fact, Rue suspected Uncle Rabiffano had more of an effect. Uncle Rabiffano was a very odd sort of werewolf. He often shopped with them, and was always open to advise on outfit coordination, hair, and hats. Adoring him as she did, Primrose was wide open to his influence. Fortunately, Uncle Biffy was the most fashionable member of Rue's father's household. Which wasn't saying much, when one considered Lord Maccon and his pack. But was saying a great deal if pitted against Rue's adopted father and all the drones. Lord Akeldama's taste was flashy, Uncle Rabiffano's was elegant. Both girls had adored Dama's style when they were six, but now they sought Rabiffano's council and Lord Akeldama's approval afterward. It was a delicate wardrobe situation that Rue only managed to balance because the two gentlemen lived in separate houses. They both knew, of course, that the other had influence. It took a great deal of wheedling to convince each that the other didn't have too much influence.

Walking dresses in “The Girl’s Own Annual,” 1890 via shewhoworshipscarlin tumblr

Rue's Mother's Profession
Her mother's profession, that of secret preternatural advisor to Queen Victoria, sometime spymaster, and member of the Shadow Council, was supposed to be just that . . . secret. Only Britain’s most respectable vampires and werewolves, and a select handful of progressive politicians, even knew of the Shadow Council's existence let alone the muhjah. Rue had never quite figured out what her mother specifically did, but it certainly kept said mother busy most nights. Her Paw had once said, not entirely sarcastically, that, "It is a position that allows my darling wife to meddle on as wide a scale as possible. She has the whole Empire to organize and terrorize. Keeps her mostly out of household business, offspring. I should be grateful, if I were you." Rue had taken this as advise, and given her mother's personality, been very grateful indeed.

Regarding Aunt Ivy's becoming a vampire, Rue's birth, & Lady Kingair's metamorphsis
Rue's parents had been roundly blamed for all three accidents. But they were collectively so powerful, all the complaining and grumbling was conducted behind their backs. Each ignored accusations of misconduct in their own special way – her mother by willful ignorance, her father by pure cussed obtuseness, and Dama by constant distraction.

Matej Sternen (Sloven artist, 1870-1949).jpg

Lady Kingair in a Pickle
The werewolf's smile broadened. "Kingair can only act under orders from the Shadow Council when they do not conflict with the brigadier. It is a curious position to be in as a pack, for we are now getting two sets of orders: one from the Dewan at home, to give their agent time, and the other from the brigadier, to rescue his kidnapped wife. Lady Kingair, as you might imagine, is not happy to be placed in this situation. Her position is already tenuous, as a female Alpha she is not permitted official rank in the British Army."

Percy Doesn’t Like Lady Kingair
"Somehow, I feel he'll be more forthcoming than my dear little niece."
"Your niece? Oh, Lady Kingair. Yes, you're probably right in that. A most disagreeable female."
"Come now, Percy, was she not instantly enamored of you? How unpleasant to have to earn a lady's regard for once." Rue stood, hoping Percy would take the hint. After a moment, he stood as well, gathering up his book and making his way to her door. Rue felt a little bad about her teasing. After all, Prim was right, poor Percy didn't seek out feminine attention on purpose.

Heat of India
Spoo was napping with the other decklings in her hammock. Above decks was as stiffing as bellow had been. The sun beat down, the day murky with stirred up dust and sediment, the mudflats and waters still. Even the sky rail seemed to be slumbering, the mechanical elephant still and silent above Colaba Station. Everyone waited for the worst of the day's heat to pass.

"A Stroll on the Beach" by Michael Ancher, 1896 via @MimiMatthewsEsq Tumblr


{Gail's monthly read along for February is Terrier: The Legend of Beka Cooper Book 1 by Tamora Pierce.}

GAIL'S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .
1890-1910 Knut Ekwall - Anne Sophie Ekenmann via history-of-fashion tumblr

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Your Tisane of Smart . . .
NYPL Releases High-res scans of old books & manuscripts

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .
The Daily Word Counts of 39 Famous Authors


PROJECT ROUND UP


  • Imprudence ~ Custard Protocol Book the Second. Edit pass. Releases July 19, 2016 in print & eBook to US.

  • Poison or Protect ~ A Delightfully Deadly Novella. Reworking & trimming. Release date to come. Gail's first foray into hybrid land, featuring a grown up and several-times widowed Preshea and the gentle Scottish captain who could change everything.




Gail Carriger's Scribbles!



The Custard Protocol Series (1890s ~ ongoing)
1 Prudence, 2 Imprudence (July 19, 2016)
$0.99 short stories (ebook only)
Marine Biology; My Sister's Song; Fairy Debt;
The Curious Case (featuring Alessandro Tarabotti)

Book News:
Ingrid De Vrieze of Babelio says of Timeless: “Une fin de saga exceptionnelle.”

Quote of the Day:
“The man behind the bar told us the things were called Green Swizzles; and, if ever I marry and have a son, Green Swizzle Wooster is the name that will go down on the register...”
~ Carry On, Jeeves by P.G. Wodehouse

Want Gail in you inbox once a month? Get the Chirrup!
Gail on Facebook & Twitter & Goodreads & Tumblr.
Gail's fashion blog ~ Retro Rack.
The best place to talk all things Parasol Protectorate is on its Facebook Group.

Questions about Gail's steampunk world? There's a wiki for that!

Feb. 1st, 2016

Blogging - WIth Computer

Prudence Available In Trade Paperback Tomorrow


"...author of some of the most pronounced and widely-read tripe ever put on the market."
~ P.G. Wodehouse

Prudence hits shelves in trade paperback size tomorrow, Gentle Reader. I know many of you are particular fans of this edition.


Here's some background fun bits and bobs for you, to celebrate the release...

Inspiration behind Prudence



Praise for Prudence


Stacie Penney of The Words Nerds says:
“Honestly, the whole thing pulls together many elements that I really like from Carriger’s novels — women who are in charge, men who admire them, sassy conversations, and devices galore.”

Karissa on Hidden by Pages says:
“I think this is Carriger’s best series yet.”

Candace’s Book Blog says:
“I don’t even know how to put this book to justice. There’s no way I can possibly explain how much I loved this. I loved the humor and the absolute silly ridiculousness. The characters were quirky, fun, delightful, and so much more. It was so well rounded and so well done…”

All About Romance says of the audiobook:
“It took just minutes to realize that Moira Quirk is the perfect narrator for this book, bringing the right sense of humor and tone to every character. Yes, indeed, some are rather over the top – Lord Akeldama most notably – but that’s exactly how Ms. Carriger writes the characters.”

Prudence in Japan

{Gail's monthly read along for February is Terrier: The Legend of Beka Cooper Book 1 by Tamora Pierce.}

GAIL'S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .
1890s Arthur Hopkins (British artist, 1848-1930) Woman by the Sea

Your Infusion of Cute . . .
Minnesota Brothers Create 18-Foot Snow Octopus

Your Tisane of Smart . . .
10 Surprising Facts About Tea

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .
Examining the Wonderful World of Steampunk: Maritime Terrorists, Time Travelers, and Mad Science


PROJECT ROUND UP


  • Imprudence ~ Custard Protocol Book the Second. Awaiting copy edits. Releases July 19, 2016 in print & eBook to US.

  • Poison or Protect ~ A Delightfully Deadly Novella. Reworking & trimming. Release date to come. Gail's first foray into hybrid land, featuring a grown up and several-times widowed Preshea and the gentle Scottish captain who could change everything.




Gail Carriger's Scribbles!



The Custard Protocol Series (1890s ~ ongoing)
1 Prudence, 2 Imprudence (July 19, 2016)
$0.99 short stories (ebook only)
Marine Biology; My Sister's Song; Fairy Debt;
The Curious Case (featuring Alessandro Tarabotti)

Book News:
JL Dribble says of The Curious Case: “This story serves as a lovely taste of the shared world of Gail Carriger’s three series, the Parasol Protectorate, Custard Protocol, and Finishing School, in terms of both world-building and writing style.”

Quote of the Day:
“The sort of girl who reduces you to pulp with sixteen sets of tennis and a few rounds of golf and then comes down to dinner as fresh as a daisy, expecting you to take an intelligent interest in Freud.”
~ Carry On, Jeeves by P.G. Wodehouse

Want Gail in you inbox once a month? Get the Chirrup!
Gail on Facebook & Twitter & Goodreads & Tumblr.
Gail's fashion blog ~ Retro Rack.
The best place to talk all things Parasol Protectorate is on its Facebook Group.

Questions about Gail's steampunk world? There's a wiki for that!

Jan. 29th, 2016

Blogging - WIth Computer

Casting Prudence the Movie (and Disinfectant Sunflowers)


Hello, dear Gentle Reader. One of the questions I often get is how I might dream cast my books. It's a fun mental exercise, although I'm not married to any casting and pretty open to other people's thoughts. My only restriction is that the person be able to do a proper British accent, which, frankly leaves most Americans well out of it. I may not be able to do one myself, but I sure can tell when it's off. And it drives me bonkers. Anyway, here we go...



Dream cast for Prudence


Rue (Prudence Akeldama): Jessica Brown Findlay

Source

Best known for her tragic role as Lady Sybil in Downton Abby, I chose Jessica Brown Findlay mainly because she can (obviously) do the right upper crust accent for Rue. Also, I think she would have fun with a more upbeat cheerful role. Rue is often described as round and jolly and while this actress is skinny (aren't they all?) she does have a sweet round expressive face which I think could do well for my main character.

Primrose Tunstell: Felicity Jones

Source

Primrose is Rue's best friend and main confidant. Rue and Prim look a little alike, in fact they use this in their schemes, often pretending to be the rich and feckless "Hisselpenny sisters." Occasionally, they will even switch names when visiting those who don't know them by sight (most do know them by reputation). Primrose is more reserved and interested in manners and organization than Rue. I'm thinking of Felicity's portrayal of the sister in Hysteria (Emily Dalrymple) when casting Primrose.

Frankly, given the skill of both the above actresses, I could also see Felicity play Rue and Jessica play Primrose. Another good alternate for either? Daisy Ridley

Percy Tunstell: Simon Woods

Source

I know Simon Woods from Cranford and I was thinking of him as the physical model as I wrote Percy. I don't know if he is a natural redhead but he looks good as one. I think he could play the part of stuck up bookish weirdly irresistible Percy beautifully. Although, I bet Tom Felton could also do a great job.

Quesnel Lefoux: Freddie Stroma

Source

Quesnel is French, raised in England, but bilingual and educated in France. I want a really boyish cheerful clownish feel for him, but also an actor able to show strong emotion and sex appeal. Quesnel is at least ten years older than the three other main characters, so he could be played by an actor in his 30s. When I describe him in the books, I was thinking someone like Alex Pettyfer (possibly too pretty?) crossed with young Leonardo DiCaprio. So I basically ended up with Freddie Stroma. But can he put a tiny hint of French into his accent? That's the question. If not, one wonders: how good is Vincent Lecoeur's English? Then again I've had a long running affection for Charlie Hunnam (from his Queer as Folk days, naturally) but he's gotten awfully weather beaten (I blame Sons of Anarchy).

I guess I am picking lots of Harry Potter actors (or might have-been) because they are all now around the correct age to be the characters in this series. Woe is me.

Tasherit Sekhmet: Indira Varma or Lisa Ray

Source

Source

Tasherit Sekhmet is drawn, in my head, off a combination of Nefertiti and Claudia Lynx and this magazine ad for shampoo showing an exotic woman in a robe that I clipped years ago. I don't see her as particularly puffy lipped and that seems to be something a lot of Middle Eastern and Indian actresses are getting done these days. A bit disappointing actually, I dithered over casting Priyanka Chopra as a result. Also Tasherit isn't cute. Someone like Aishwarya Rai, while utterly stunning, is too cute. I like Indira Varma because she is intensely regal, and can do a range of accents. Lisa Ray is also a great option, but can she change her Canadian accent for the role? Miss Sekhmet is a fun one to cast because she doesn't have to have a British accent. In fact, I'd welcome a bit of something else hinted as she speaks. Also her origins are unknown. Finally, I could see her played by a range of ages, so long as she has the regal beauty, so I'm not married to the Hollywood attitude of no female on screen after about age 30 (sigh).

On Disinfectant Sunflowers

"The Value of the sunflower as a disinfectant of the atmosphere has been well ascertained, but it seems not yet to be sufficiently appreciated. A German physician, Dr. Valentine, of Frankfort, has published an article on the subject, giving many facts to show that this flower has the property of purifying air laden with marsh miasm, by absorbing the noxious gases, and exhaling out ozonized oxygen. Among other instances, it is mentioned that a Dutch landowner, whose property includes some land on the banks of the Scheldt subject to floods, has planted three or four plots, thirty of forty yards from his house, with the effect of so much improving the air that for ten years no one on his property had been attacked with miasmatic fever, which continued to prevail on the neighboring properties, where similar precautions were not taken. Besides this, as the French Sanitary Commission lately pointed out, the sunflower is a most useful plant. It yields about forty per cent of good oil, the leaves furnish an excellent fodder, and the stem, being rich in saltpetre and potash, makes a good fuel."
~ Godey's Lady's Book and Magazine September 1872

Based off a post originally written for My Book, The Movie for Soulless.

{Gail's monthly read along for February is Terrier: The Legend of Beka Cooper Book 1 by Tamora Pierce.}

GAIL'S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .
1892-1894  The Victoria & Albert Museum

Your Infusion of Cute . . .
Lilliput Holds My Ebook For Me

Your Tisane of Smart . . .
The Top 12 Literary Quotes about Tea

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .
What Are Your Characters Ashamed Of?


PROJECT ROUND UP


  • Imprudence ~ Custard Protocol Book the Second. Edit pass. Releases July 19, 2016 in print & eBook to US.

  • Poison or Protect ~ A Delightfully Deadly Novella. Reworking & trimming. Release date to come. Gail's first foray into hybrid land, featuring a grown up and several-times widowed Preshea and the gentle Scottish captain who could change everything.




Gail Carriger's Scribbles!



The Custard Protocol Series (1890s ~ ongoing)
1 Prudence, 2 Imprudence (July 19, 2016)
$0.99 short stories (ebook only)
Marine Biology; My Sister's Song; Fairy Debt;
The Curious Case (featuring Alessandro Tarabotti)

Book News:
Leonard Was Hopeful says of The Curious Case: “Even in this short story, Carriger maintains her kid-glove grip on the "free and indirect discourse" style initiated by Jane Austen; her use of language and tone is always spot-on for the time period.”

Quote of the Day:
“I don’t deserve my friends,” she remarked quietly. “Sure you do, opal of happiness,” Cleon said. “We’d’ve failed mathematics to a man without you, for one thing.”
~ Tamora Pierce, Squire: Book 3 of the Protector of the Small Quartet

Want Gail in you inbox once a month? Get the Chirrup!
Gail on Facebook & Twitter & Goodreads & Tumblr.
Gail's fashion blog ~ Retro Rack.
The best place to talk all things Parasol Protectorate is on its Facebook Group.

Questions about Gail's steampunk world? There's a wiki for that!

Jan. 27th, 2016

Blogging - WIth Computer

Gail Carriger Reviews The Raven Ring by Patricia C. Wrede


I hope you all enjoyed The Raven Ring, and that for some of you this is your introduction to Wrede and Lyra. Lyra is one of the first epic fantasy worlds that I remember reading as a girl that was written by a woman. And while I always preferred Wrede's lighter fare, I have a number of friends who consider Lyra one of the great inventions of the genre.

The Raven Ring was always my favorite. I think it stands on its own and you either enjoy Wrede's lyrical, almost oratory, way of telling high fantasy, or you don't. But if you do, this particular book is a great window into her world.


The Raven Ring features a tough mountain lass, who just happens to be a badass fighter. It is basically a murder mystery with magic. Eleret must figure out who murdered her mother and what that has to do with the magical Raven Ring that is her only inheritance. It also features two marvelous love interests and a fun ending.

Sticking with this theme of noir meets fantasy, I've chosen Terrier: The Legend of Beka Cooper Book 1 by Tamora Pierce as next month's read. February is a short month and this is a quick read, being YA. It has a very urban feel to it which I think you will enjoy. It's the first of three books, but it's fine to stop after the first one. Terrier is set in Pierce's Tortall fantasy county, which is not particularly noted for its inventive world building. You don't read Pierce for the world, you read her for the characters. Be prepared to fall in love. Her Song of the Lioness quartet is my favorite series of all time, and responsible for the fact that my own Finishing School series is four books long.


{Gail's monthly read along for February is Terrier: The Legend of Beka Cooper Book 1 by Tamora Pierce.}

GAIL'S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .
2015 Bunka Fashion College Fashion Show 2015 _ JAPANESE STREETS.jpg

Your Infusion of Cute . . .
Lilliput reads a manual on slow cooking

Your Tisane of Smart . . .
8 Varieties of Hot Tea Everyone Should Try

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .
When I Did Some Physical Therapy For My Wrist


PROJECT ROUND UP


  • Imprudence ~ Custard Protocol Book the Second. Edit pass. Releases July 19, 2016 in print & eBook to US.

  • Poison or Protect ~ A Delightfully Deadly Novella. Reworking & trimming. Release date to come. Gail's first foray into hybrid land, featuring a grown up and several-times widowed Preshea and the gentle Scottish captain who could change everything.




Gail Carriger's Scribbles!



The Custard Protocol Series (1890s ~ ongoing)
1 Prudence, 2 Imprudence (July 19, 2016)
$0.99 short stories (ebook only)
Marine Biology; My Sister's Song; Fairy Debt;
The Curious Case (featuring Alessandro Tarabotti)

Book News:
Soulless made B&N SciFi & Fantasy Blog for “Genre Mashups: Fantasy Novels for Austen Fans”

Quote of the Day:
"We are born in an age when only the dull are treated seriously, and I live in terror of not being misunderstood."
~ Oscar Wilde

Want Gail in you inbox once a month? Get the Chirrup!
Gail on Facebook & Twitter & Goodreads & Tumblr.
Gail's fashion blog ~ Retro Rack.
The best place to talk all things Parasol Protectorate is on its Facebook Group.

Questions about Gail's steampunk world? There's a wiki for that!

Jan. 25th, 2016

Blogging - WIth Computer

Victorian Money Means Coins ~ Research Behind Prudence


This is one of those blog posts in which Gail demonstrates the nitty-gritty of her research in an aggravatingly nit-picky way. This is an amended reboot from 2012 when I first started writign Prudence. Read at your own risk.
To protect the guilty I'm not going to name any names, Gentle Reader, and I'd like to state up front that currency is not my expertise. But I was reading a book of the alt-historical romantic variety. The hero visits a whore in Victorian London, 1883. For her pains he "pulled out far more notes than planned and handed them to her."

Le Bon Ton Date-  Monday, June 1, 1857 Item ID-  v. 39, plate 14

I had to put the book down.

Coins vs. Notes in Victorian England


First, bank notes are drawn on a bank more like a cashier's check than paper money today, which means the whore in our above example would have to go into a bank to redeem her notes or find herself a very non-suspicious tradesman, in modern times this is a little like trying to break a $1000 bill.

Second, NO ONE regularly carried notes or paid for anything with notes until well after the 1920s. Culturally, no one would carry that much money into the kind of area of London where whore houses are located. For services people paid with coin, with tradesmen (who handle goods) the wealthy actually paid via their butler or valet or abigail's coin, or on account, because it was beneath them to handle money.

Even, as the author was trying to get across, this was a highly generous gesture, NOT WITH PAPER MONEY HE WOULDN'T.

We writers all make mistakes. I have made more than my share. And there comes a time when every historical author must stop researching and begin writing (or the book never gets written). I do understand and believe that some modernization is necessary in alt-history genre fiction because most readers want their books to be fun and entertaining. It is our business, as authors, to provide that first. (Now for genre's like historical fiction or biographies or what have you this is a different matter. I am speaking in terms of managing expectations.)

1880-1885  Wien Museum

However, I do think something as basic as currency should be second knowledge if you are going to write in any alternate time period. It's like getting the basic clothing terms correct. (In another unnamed steampunk novel, a corset was referred to as a bodice. FYI, both terms are incorrect. At the time, a corset would have been mainly referred to as stays. The bodice is the top part of a dress. Thus, I spent the entire scene confused into thinking the character in question was swanning around with only her torso dressed, rather than entirely in her underthings as was intended. But, I digress . . .)


On Victorian Money (from Baedecker's London 1896)

  • sovereign or pound (gold) = 20 shillings

  • half-sovereign (gold) = 10 shillings

  • crown (silver) = 5 shillings

  • half-crown (silver) = (2 shillings & a six penny piece)

  • double florin (silver - rare) = 4 shillings

  • florin (silver) = 2 shillings

  • shilling (silver & same size as a sovereign) = 12 pennies

  • six penny (silver) = 6 pennies

  • three penny (silver) = 3 pennies

  • penny (bronze) = 4 farthings

  • half penny = 2 farthings

  • farthing


From lot at auction.

I know, I know, overly complicated. Think back to that wonderful scene with the money exchange in Room With a View when Cousin Charlotte comes to visit Lucy's family.

"In England alone of the more important states of Europe the currency is arranged without reference to the decimal system."
~ Karl Baedeker, 1896

Victorian Money in Terms of Value


In 1896: 1 sovereign was approximately: 5 American dollars, 25 francs, 20 German marks, or 10 Austrian florins.

To reiterate: The Bank of England issued notes for 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 pounds or more. They were generally not used in ordinary life as most people "dealt in coin." Gentlemen and ladies, when shopping, either had a servant with them to handle the coin (including gratuities & all fares) or paid on credit (AKA account). A shop would then send a bill around to the townhouse at the end of the month on Black Monday, which would be paid by the house steward, accountant, or personal secretary. A gentleman handling his own money is either no gentleman or engaged in nefarious activities like gambling or trade.

Baedeker advises letters of credit (AKA circular notes) drawn on a major bank for travel, to be exchanged for local currency upon arrival. He also advises never carrying a full days worth of coinage about your person.

It's important, as historical writers, for us to grasp a larger picture - so allow me to attempt to put this into perspective...


Middle class wages per annum 1850-1890:

  • A Bank of England Clerk £75 to £500

  • Civil Service clerk £80 to £200

  • Post Office clerk £90 to £260

  • Senior Post Office clerk £350 to £500


So lets say a middle class wage was anything from £75 to £500 a year, that's £1.44 - £9.61 a week for a relatively comfortable lifestyle. Since there is no £1 note, to "pull out far more notes than planned" as our unnamed author writes above, and give such to a whore, means at least £5 per note. More than one means at least £10. Not only should this character not have been carrying that kind of money, he just tipped that woman better than one week's salary for the upper middle class to someone who likely could never break that bill, today that's something on the order of $2,500.

A gentleman of lower standing, say a younger son with a Living could expect something similar to upper middle class £350-500. Titled or large landed gentry could pull in anything from £1000 to £10,000 a year (what, you thought the 99% was a new thing?). A dowry for landed country gentry's daughter of few means would be about £100 a year. Still, even the highest aristocrat wouldn't tip in notes, ever. If for no other reason than it's the kind of thing the neuvo riche, or An American might do. (It's worth noting that poor were a great deal poorer, earning shillings per week or less.)

Later on, this same author writes "cost me twenty quid to delay matters" of bribing a coroner to delay a funeral. That's a heavy bribe, about $5000. I couldn't find any information on coroner's pay in Victorian times (the job was either uncommon, not yet official, or went by another name) so let's say grave digger, which is well below middle class, so a £20 bribe would probably be about a year's income for the man.

End of Rant

Sorry, I just had to get that off my chest. Or should I say "out of my chest"? Chink chink.

So, if you have a Victorian setting (really, anything up through the 1920s) what do we pay with?

Yes, that's right children, coins!

This is also a rather depressingly clear indication of how Gail Carriger spends her weekends. I am such a dork.

"I may be a chump, but it's my boast that I don't owe a penny to a single soul – not counting tradesmen, of course."
 ~ Carry On, Jeeves by P.G. Wodehouse

How does this relate to Prudence?


Well might you ask. What I had to do (or thought I had to do) was determine the conversion rate between pounds and rupees traveling from England to India in 1895. Unfortunately, Baedecker didn't write for India.

What I ended up having to do was make some very loose estimations based on the above assumptions of middle class wages and the information I could source, which was monthly accounts for a household of four living in India on a diplomat's wage between 1880 and 1897 (something on the order of £500 per annum). Here's my fun chart:


Here's hoping the above was, if not fun, at least informative or, if you yourself are an author, helpful.

Pip pip!


{Gail's monthly read along for January The Raven's Ring by Patricia Wrede. You do not have to have read any other Lyra books.}

GAIL'S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .
1959 Lana Turner and Karin Dicker in ‘Imitation of Life’ theniftyfifies

Your Infusion of Cute . . .
Octopus Candle Holder

Your Tisane of Smart . . .
Knickerbockers for Women: From Under the Hiking Skirts to the Fad of the Hour

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .
“Writing my books I enjoy. It is the thinking them out that is apt to blot the sunshine from my life.”
― P.G. Wodehouse


PROJECT ROUND UP


  • Imprudence ~ Custard Protocol Book the Second. Awaiting copy edits. Releases July 19, 2016 in print & eBook to US.

  • Secret Project Novella 1 ~ Gail's first foray into hybrid land. About to start first edit pass.




Gail Carriger's Books!

The Finishing School Series (1850s ~ completed)
1 Etiquette & Espionage, 2 Curtsies & Conspiracies,
3 Waistcoats & Weaponry, 4 Manners & Mutiny

The Parasol Protectorate Series (1870s ~ completed)
1 Soulless, 2 Changeless, 3 Blameless, 4 Heartless, 5 Timeless

The Custard Protocol Series (1890s ~ ongoing)
1 Prudence, 2 Imprudence (July 19, 2016)
Parasol Protectorate Series manga graphic novels (1870s)
$0.99 short stories (ebook only)
Marine Biology; My Sister's Song; Fairy Debt;

Book News:
Sam of ARC Review says of Manners & Mutiny: “While I’m having a hard time letting these characters go, I won’t forget the mayhem they caused, and the joy they gave me as a reader.”

Quote of the Day:
“Da Silva announced his intention of settling in the library to commune with his muse. Curtis, feeling sorry for the muse, said that he preferred to explore the house and acquaint himself with its features.”
~ Think of England by KJ Charles

Gail's fashion blog ~ Retro Rack.
The best place to talk all things Parasol Protectorate is on its
Facebook Group.

Jan. 22nd, 2016

Blogging - WIth Computer

Book Review ~ The Pirate's Booty by Alex Westmore


Thanks to Little Brown (my publisher) and Moira Quirk (my narrator). It's a wonderful honor to win for audio. I was raised on audiobooks (no TV) so I really appreciate the art form.


An now, here's a bit of a review for you...

Books: The Pirate's Booty
Author: Alex Westmore
Series: Yes. The Plundered Chronicles Book 1 So far this is the first of two (not sure how many are planned total). However, this one stands fine on its own. The second Shiver Her Timbers, released January 11.
Kindle edition $4.99 (not available in print)


I don't quite know what to say about The Pirate's Booty. I finished it late one night over the holidays, and I kept waking up in the middle of the night afterwards ~ not thinking about the book, but thinking about how to write a review of the book. The story really had the emotional tenor of a 1960s pulp mystery, like J.D. McDonald's Travis McGee series. By that, I mean there is a Gary Sue element to the central character. In Pirate's Booty the protagonist is a woman, Quinn, but she is not a Mary Sue. She is flirtatious with all of the girls, romances everybody, and is generally utterly charming and dashing in a "hunky hero please sweep me off my feet" kind of way. Quinn rescues women via her sexual prowess (a hallmark of Travis McGee). There adds to the swashbuckling pirate aspect, which reminded me of something like Alexandre Dumas' The Three Musketeers.

So let's get into some detail.

Main Character: Quinn
Quinn is an extremely appealing character, she is meant to be. She is also a lesbian in a time period when the concept doesn't even really exist. Yet every woman who she meets falls in love with her and the few who find out she is a woman stay in love with her. Also, all of her friends who find out are immediately accepting. This didn't bother me as much as it should. She is a womanizer, although she is nice about it. And I did find myself questioning whether I would be as tolerant of Quinn if she were male. I don't think I would. And since I don't want to self-examine my own judgement in this matter, I'll just leave that there and proceed with this review.

Historical Setting
The historical research, apart from certain social issues previously mentioned, is very good. Although the author does tend to include lots of information about existing historical characters in info-dump form that is a little detrimental to pace. I personally would have preferred a few more small details about the time period, since it isn't one I'm familiar with. For example: I'd like some more about the clothing, the food, the texture, the materials on the ship, and the smell of the towns. However, this is a mere quibble, these are things that are peculiar to my interests. Westmore is clearly a historian rather than an archaeologist, for her concern is over accuracy in language, town layouts, geography, older place names, and so forth.

Via The Pirates Story


On Female Pirates
I have always craved good, well written stories (perhaps a YA historical novel) featuring Anne Bonny, Mary Read, and similar famous female pirates of the past. I have a feeling this is the close that I will ever come. That said, this is not a YA novel. It opens with a sex scene and there are several more throughout the rest of the book. They are not graphic, at least not in an erotica way. I would say they are, again, more appropriate to something like the Three Musketeers or 1960s pulp in their attitude towards and description of the sexual act. By which I mean, they are neither intrinsically suited to the erotica model nor the romance model as perpetuated by modern novels.

Some Final Thoughts
I am bothered by the way so many people so quickly fall in love with Quinn. In that regard, romance is the least effective aspect of this book. I did very much enjoy the historical accuracy, the swashbuckling pirate attitude, and the simple old-fashioned adventure. And while the romance is not effective, the friendships are come and go. In the end, I found myself thinking most about those Victorian sea ballads sung by sailors to women explaining how they will never settle on land because their love of the sea is Eternal. "Don't fall in love with me, my darling, for I will inevitably break your heart." Very melodramatic. In that regard this book is romantic, but in the original Victorian sentimental sense of the word and judged under that umbrella, I forgive it its foibles.

Do I think readers of my work will like this book?
I honestly don't know. It's very very different. I suspect you have to have an existing appreciation of pirate-style adventure novels. Do you also like attending Ren Faires? As a kid, did you love Treasure Island? Fancy yourself a bit of an eye-patch corset-wearing Lothario? Then yeah, you might like it. If you do, let me know?


In other reading:
I've been delving into Highlander romances. Mostly to see how authors handle the Scottish brogue since I have a Scots hero in my novella. I'm finding the sub-genre universally disappointing after having come of age reading Julie Garwood (e.g. The Secret and The Bride). Think I'll just go reread her instead.

{Gail's monthly read along for January is The Raven Ring by Patricia Wrede. You do not have to have read any other Lyra books.}

GAIL'S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .
Ladies' Cabinet Date-  Wednesday, July 1, 1846

Your Infusion of Cute . . .
A Gargantuan Octopus Rendered in Random Ballpoint Pens by Ray Cincin

Your Tisane of Smart . . .
12 Books with Badass Female Characters

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .
Ten Things I Learned About Publishing in 2015


PROJECT ROUND UP


  • Imprudence ~ Custard Protocol Book the Second. Edit pass. Releases July 19, 2016 in print & eBook to US.

  • Secret Project Novella 1 ~ Gail's first foray into hybrid land. Waiting to start next draft.




Gail Carriger's Books!

The Finishing School Series (1850s ~ completed)
1 Etiquette & Espionage, 2 Curtsies & Conspiracies,
3 Waistcoats & Weaponry, 4 Manners & Mutiny

The Parasol Protectorate Series (1870s ~ completed)
1 Soulless, 2 Changeless, 3 Blameless, 4 Heartless, 5 Timeless

The Custard Protocol Series (1890s ~ ongoing)
1 Prudence, 2 Imprudence (July 19, 2016)
Parasol Protectorate Series manga graphic novels (1870s)
$0.99 short stories (ebook only)
Marine Biology; My Sister's Song; Fairy Debt;

Book News:
The Well-Read Pirate Queen says of Manners & Mutiny: “I have absolutely adored watching these characters mature over the course of the series and for the most part they got a proper send-off by Carriger. “

Quote of the Day:
The big room downstairs was full of men and women—and a handful of assorted aliens whose sexes Gil didn’t feel qualified to guess—all talking at once in at least three languages and a dozen or more different accents, from pure Galcenian to unadulterated Portside.
~ Debra Doyle & James D. Macdonald, The Price of the Stars

Gail's fashion blog ~ Retro Rack.
The best place to talk all things Parasol Protectorate is on its
Facebook Group.

Jan. 20th, 2016

Blogging - WIth Computer

Books By Year Plus Some NYT Thoughts


Quick head's up The Color of Magic by Terry Pratchett is $0.99 on kindle today. It's a favorite Discworld book of mine and certainly informed my own humor and style as a writer. I read it first in high school. It wasn't my first Pratchett, Sorcery was (and I still own my first US edition mass market from 1989).

And now: Books By Year Plus Some NYT Thoughts


Having some fun with books and photos and the course of my career as an author the other day, Gentle Reader. Ah, nostalgia.

Actually, it was mostly me going over my novels and trying to remember details about them, you know, like publication date and relative success. I thought you too, as you are responsible, might enjoy the ride.

Before 2009

There was nothing!


2009

Soulless

Soulless did eventually hit the New York Times Bestseller list but not until 5/27/2012 when a $0.99 eBook special landed it on eBooks at #22 and Combined Print & eBooks at #37. It stayed on eBooks one more week 06/03/2012 at #28.

2010

Changeless & Blameless

Changeless and Blameless were both released in 2010, a good thing too, given Changeless has a bit of a cliff hanger. (I still get angry emails on occasion about this.) Changeless was #20 on the 04/03/2010 NYT Mass Market lists, and my first book to hit. Orbit sent me champagne and everyone telephoned me. I sat on a porch on a vineyard in Sonoma and celebrated. Blameless was also # 20 on 09/19/2010 and it held on through 09/26/2010 at #35. My first to stay on for more than a week.

2011

Heartless

Heartless was my only book to release in 2011, although a lot of things were happening behind the scenes (e.g. the graphic novel deal and the seeds of a new YA series were being born). Also I was taking the plunge into life as a full time author. Heartless released to hit #11 on Mass Market (the highest standing for any of the Parasol Protectorate books) on 07/17/2011 and through to 07/24/2011 at #26.

2012

Timeless, Soulless Vol 1, Soulless Vol. 2

2012 was a busy year with three releases, both the first two mangas came out and the final Parasol Protectorate book, Timeless. Amazon shipped Timeless a week early which spread the numbers out over three weeks instead of my normal two. No idea what might have been different had they deigned to observe the on sale date. It started at #17 on 03/18/2012 Mass Market and then went to #22 on 03/25/2012 and #31 on 04/01/2012. The manga, mostly by coincidence, was released at the same time and saw a bump in orders and sales because of this, I think. It landed at #2 on the Manga list. The second volume launched at #1 on the Manga list, for 12/09/2012, my only #1 and I'm still ridiculously proud. This was also the year Soulless made the lists for the first time.

2013

Soulless Vol. 3, Etiquette & Espionage, Curtsies & Conspiracies

2013 was another busy one with the final manga and the first two Finishing School books releasing. Etiquette & Espionage marked my transition to both children's and hard back and plonked me on the NYT Lists for YA at #9 on 02/24/2013. My first novel (as opposed to manga) to get into top 10. The final manga came in at #7 at the same time.

2014


Waistcoats & Weaponry

Waistcoats & Weaponry was my only book to release in 2014, and it came at the end of the year. Possibly as a result of this delay, but more likely as a result of the Amazon vrs. Hachette contract negotiations meets B&N not shipping signed editions debacle this was the first time since Soulless my book didn't make the lists. I was expecting it but I was still sad. Of course, it's also possible that people just didn't like the book, but I consider it the best of my YA series so I hope that's not the reason.

2015


Prudence and Manners & Mutiny

Prudence released in early 2015, my new baby and first entry into the world of adult hardcover fiction, possibly one of the hardest lists to crack. She clawed her way on at #19 on 04/05/2015. Only a few months later, on 06/03/2015, much to everyone's total surprise an eBook deal (all of the first 3 YA books at $1.99 each) put the Finishing School series onto the notoriously impossible Children's Series list at #7. This made poor little W&W a best seller at last, and I decided *technically* I could still claim an unbroken record. We wrapped up the year releasing Manners & Mutiny who hit #9. What is it with me and odd numbers?


So there you have it. All 13 of them were New York Times bestsellers via 7 different lists (Mass Market, Hardcover, eBook, Combined Print & eBook, Young Adult, Children's Series, Manga). This occasioned me checking out how many NYT lists there are (something like 37) and wondering if I could crack them all, because I'm an ambitious old cuss who likes a challenge. Considering there are lists like "Sports" I think it practically impossible for me to do so, unless I resume my previous life as an archaeologist and delve into non-fiction. (If I wrote a tomb on the Mayan Ball game, would that count as "Sports"?) One wonders if any author has ever done this; appeared on all lists, I mean.

Don't get me wrong I am delighted to have made anything. Goodness, my dears, I'm startled to even have Authorbeast as a career. Thank you so much. The fact that you go out and preorder, and buy right away, is how I make that list. It's amazing! But if I were ever fully satisfied with anything, I would cease trying to please you, and no one wants that now, do they? Someone more famous than me once said that life is about the quest and the struggle and I didn't grow up a fantasy reader for nothing.

Speaking of which, off I go a-questing. Got another book to finish writing.


{Gail's monthly read along for January is The Raven's Ring by Patricia Wrede. You do not have to have read any other Lyra books.}


GAIL'S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .
Le Moniteur de la Mode Date-  Monday, September 1, 1845

Your Infusion of Cute . . .
Shy Sea Anemone Hates Hugs

Your Tisane of Smart . . .
Gold Rush California Was Much More Expensive Than Today’s Dot Com Boom

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .
On Fans and Fan Mail



Gail Carriger's Books!

The Finishing School Series (1850s ~ completed)
1 Etiquette & Espionage, 2 Curtsies & Conspiracies,
3 Waistcoats & Weaponry, 4 Manners & Mutiny

The Parasol Protectorate Series (1870s ~ completed)
1 Soulless, 2 Changeless, 3 Blameless, 4 Heartless, 5 Timeless

The Custard Protocol Series (1890s ~ ongoing)
1 Prudence, 2 Imprudence (July 19, 2016)
Parasol Protectorate Series manga graphic novels (1870s)
$0.99 short stories (ebook only)
Marine Biology; My Sister's Song; Fairy Debt;

Book News:
The Writer Librarian interviews Yours Truly, and more on Manners & Mutiny.

Quote of the Day:
“This has gone too far. It's gone the way if bacon and mustaches.”
~ International Waters (regarding ugly Christmas sweaters)

Gail's fashion blog ~ Retro Rack.
The best place to talk all things Parasol Protectorate is on its
Facebook Group.

Jan. 18th, 2016

Blogging - WIth Computer

Book Group Poll Results ~ Gail's Thoughts on 2015's Read Alongs


I just ended my 2015 poll, designed to gather readers' favorite books out of those I chose for last year. 2015 was the first full year of the book group. This kind of poll is good for me, because it provides a great deal of insight. The books that result in the most discussion (which are the ones I pay attention to at the time) are not necessarily the ones that people liked the best. Also the books that I think will cause the most excitement, because they are similar to my own work, aren't always the most popular either.

So, the poll...

205 readers participated in the poll (which was pretty awesome as I didn't know that many people were reading along with the group!)

I'm guessing there are more out there too, likely some didn't vote because the poll isn't mobile friendly, and it's outside of common use platforms (like Feedly, or Goodreads, or FB). Some may not have voted because the didn't read all 12 books. And some just don't like polls.

RESULTS


With 23% of the vote (49 people) The Eyre Affair was the most popular read. I would guess this is also the general populace's favorite of the books we read in 2015.


Uprooted came in a close second with 47 votes (22%). This startled me as I see very little cross over with my own work and Uprooted. Still, nice to know a fairy story with a darker edge is welcome, particularly one where the ebook is overpriced. Uprooted also had a clear lead at the beginning of the poll, which tells me that the most devoted readers of my social media (and those with quickest ability to respond - likely younger) favor this book.

(I must say I don't think much of Uprooted's cover.)

In order of decreasing popularity the other books were:

  1. Court of Fives 16 (7%) ~ YA epic fantasy, historical bent, modern style*

  2. Valor's Choice 16 (7%) ~ military space opera

  3. My Man Jeeves 16 (7%) ~ vintage comedy

  4. Karen Memory 16 (7%) ~ dystopian feminist steampunk

  5. Newt’s Emerald 15 (7%) ~ gaslight fantasy regency romance

  6. Kat, Incorrigible 15 (7%) ~ mid-grade regency comedy

  7. Ridiculous 7 (4%) ~ regency romance, modern style

  8. The Outlaws of Sherwood 5 (2%) ~ vintage alt-history retelling

  9. Jinn & Juice 3 (1%) ~ urban fantasy, modern style

  10. Passion Blue 0 (0%) ~ YA historical


In cases were the books were ranked the same, I put them in order of my favorite first.
* By modern style I mean written with the pace, plot tropes and character archetypes, and graphic sex we see more common in books written since the age of indy publishing. Yes, it is different.

Some thoughts:


  • I'm not certain how many people who voted actually read all 12 books. In the future, I might add a check box asking that question at the top.

  • I'm looking into a better platform for the poll in the future. Last I checked, nothing integrated well with blogger, so it may have to be an external survey generator. Could use a Google form the way I do with the Chirrup. Not sure yet.

  • Despite their 3rd place ranking, I don't see myself choosing anymore Wodehouse or anything as gritty as Karen Memory again.

  • I'm also unlikely to go for mid-grade or straight up historical. The first I now believe is too childish, the second too dry, for this particular Book Group.

  • The two books I thought most like my own were Newt's Emerald and Ridiculous. Either the people in my book group have more varied taste than my fans (who always ask for something to read that's exactly like my books) or my own estimate of what's similar to my books is wrong. Or I've no idea what people like about my books. Or all three.


STILL want something to read?
While You Are Waiting ~ Books To Read While Gail Types



{Gail's monthly read along for January is The Raven Ring by Patricia Wrede. You do not have to have read any other Lyra books.}

GAIL'S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .
via shewhoworshipscarlin.tumblr.com Summer dress fashion plate ,1808

Your Infusion of Cute . . .
Ephemeral Elegance @drapedinhistory  Such an enchanting image of a couple ice skating, c.1880s

Your Tisane of Smart . . .
Regency History: When Was London Season?

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .
We Need To Talk About Territories


PROJECT ROUND UP


  • Imprudence ~ Custard Protocol Book the Second. Edit pass. Releases July 19, 2016 in print & eBook to US.

  • Secret Project Novella 1 ~ Gail's first foray into hybrid land. Rough draft done, wait to start first pass.




Gail Carriger's Books!

The Finishing School Series (1850s ~ completed)
1 Etiquette & Espionage, 2 Curtsies & Conspiracies,
3 Waistcoats & Weaponry, 4 Manners & Mutiny

The Parasol Protectorate Series (1870s ~ completed)
1 Soulless, 2 Changeless, 3 Blameless, 4 Heartless, 5 Timeless

The Custard Protocol Series (1890s ~ ongoing)
1 Prudence, 2 Imprudence (July 19, 2016)
Parasol Protectorate Series manga graphic novels (1870s)
$0.99 short stories (ebook only)
Marine Biology; My Sister's Song; Fairy Debt;

Book News:
Gail appears on SF Signal Podcast: The Obligatory Best of 2015 Episode

Quote of the Day:
“My dear fellow, the truth isn't quite the sort of thing one tells to a nice, sweet, refined girl.”
 ~ Oscar Wilde

Gail's fashion blog ~ Retro Rack.
The best place to talk all things Parasol Protectorate is on its
Facebook Group.

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